Tag Archives: Jen Marlowe

1 teen, 6 cops, 1 bullet and 5 years of a Black family screaming for justice

Dear friends and supporters,

Today is Ramarley Graham’s 24th birthday, Or–it would have been–if on Feb 2, 2012,  the NYPD had not trailed Ramarley (an unarmed teenager), broke down the door to his house, and shot him at close range in the chest, killing him–in front of his grandmother and 6-year-old brother.

I hope you will take a moment to read the article I wrote for Colorlines (with Amy Myers, intern at the Center for Constitutional Rights) about Ramarley, how he was killed, and the family’s struggle for some modicum of justice.

Excerpt of the article (published today in Colorlines)  is below, and you can also read it here.

As always, thoughts, questions, responses are welcomed.

In solidarity with all who have lost a loved one to police violence,
Jen Marlowe
Donkeysaddle Projects
www.donkeysaddle.org

Ramarley Chinoor Patricia

Ramarley with his little brother and grandmother–both of whom were home when NYPD killed Ramarley with one shot

1 Teen, 6 Cops, 1 Bullet and 5 Years of a Black Family Screaming for Justice
by Jen Marlowe and Amy Myers

A few months before his big brother, Ramarley Graham, was shot to death by a New York Police Department (NYPD) officer, 6-year-old Chinnor Campbell was being bullied in school. His 18-year-old brother showed him how to put up his hands to defend himself and demonstrated how to punch using a pillow. “You’ve got to fight back, or people will keep bullying you,” Ramarley coached.

Their mother, Constance Malcolm, says these lessons were typical of their relationship: “Ramarley would take him to the park, pick him up from school, just do what a big brother would do with his little brother.”

Chinnor didn’t have his big brother’s guidance for much longer. On February 2, 2012, a White NYPD officer named Richard Haste entered Graham’s Bronx apartment and fired a fatal shot into his chest. He was only feet away, as was their maternal grandmother, Patricia Hartley. 

Graham would be turning 24 today (April 12) if Haste and his colleagues had not followed him home from a bodega they were surveilling, kicked in the door and fatally shot him.

Read the rest of the article here

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Filed under Criminal Justice, police brutality, Uncategorized

Witness Bahrain honored with Audience Award at STIFF

Dear friends,

What a weekend.

Witness Bahrain premiered at the Seattle Transmedia & Independent Film Festival to two sold-out audiences.

–Charles Mudede of The Stranger (Seattle’s preeminent alternative weekly newspaper called it “one of the best documentaries I have seen this year” and said the film is “fearless, insightful, and has a big heart for those who are in this long but beautiful struggle.” (Full review below.)

–Before both screenings, we hosted a photo exhibit of Bahraini child prisoners, courtesy of Americans for Democracy & Human Rights in Bahrain. And, a lively discussion/Q&A was held after both screenings with Witness Bahrain Co-Producer Nada Alwadi, Director/Producer Jen Marlowe and donkeysaddle projects Project Manager Amer Shurrab.

–Mike McCormick interviewed Nada Alwadi and Jen Marlowe about the film and the freedom struggle in Bahrain on KEXP’s Mind Over Matter. (Link to interview here.)

Hedgebrook hosted a Tweet Chat about the film, and about Bahrain with Nada and Jen. You can read the transcript here.

–And, to top it all off–Witness Bahrain received the Audience Award at STIFF.

It is tremendously exciting that Witness Bahrain was recognized with this award right out the gate.  But, the credit for this award goes to the audience. We are so moved by how many of you came out, supported, and showed enthusiasm for this film and, most importantly, for the struggle for freedom, democracy and human rights in Bahrain.

We hope that many many more of you will have the opportunity to see the film in the months to come. If you want to help organize a community screening, please contact Amer Shurrab. And, you can support the film’s ability to screen world-wide by clicking here.

In solidarity, and with gratitude,
Jen Marlowe, Director/Producer, Witness Bahrain
Amer Shurrab, Project Manager, donkeysaddle projects

Twitter: @donkeysaddleorg
Blog: View from the donkey’s saddle

Photo 1: Review of Witness Bahrain in The Stranger
Photo 2: Amer, Jen and Nada after the premiere at STIFF

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Filed under Bahrain, Human Rights