Tag Archives: I Am Troy Davis

Mumia Abu Jamal responds to I AM TROY DAVIS: “May it fuel the anti-death penalty movement”

Mumia Abu JamaI knew that my publisher (the amazing Haymarket Books) had sent a copy of I Am Troy Davis to Mumia Abu Jamal.  So when I saw his name and return address on the envelope, I should not have been surprised–yet I was. Surprised, and a little star struck. I had been following Mumia’s case–and his writing–for years now. It took me a few minutes to really process that he was writing to me, and that he was writing in response to the book I had written with Troy Davis and his family.

The next day, I got another letter from Mumia. This one was the text of what I later found out was a radio spot he had done about the book for the Prison Radio, an independent multi-media production studio dedicated to challenging unjust police and prosecutorial misconduct that results in mass incarceration, racism, and gender discrimination.

You can listen to Mumia’s three-minute radio spot about I Am Troy Davis here.

And, below, is the letter he wrote me, which I received his permission to post.

And–you can buy a copy of I Am Troy Davis to be sent as a gift to a prisoner here.

Dear Jen,

As you may know, I’m in the midst of working on a book, so it took me awhile to get to Troy’s. But, of course, I did.

It is, as I’m sure you know, a powerful, damning story of a human tragedy.

It is, moreover, a real condemnation of the U.S. Way of Death.

When reading it, I couldn’t help but think of how politics has completely dominated the judiciary–and, without question, the pardon/parole machinery.

His family (esp. Mom & Sister) fought–quite literally–to their last breath, never doubting that in an injustice so strong, surely they could finish their days in the company of their son/brother.

I think, in many ways, the family and the activists underestimated the level of rot in the system, never really believing that they would betray their oaths–and visit on Troy the foul fullness of state murder.

I remember being buoyed when the U.S. Supremes actually sent it back for an evidentiary hearing.

Once again, they raised hope, only to spit disappointment on the friends and family of Troy.

I will surely distribute it, and, perhaps, donate it to the library, so that many, many guys can read it.

I thank you for sharing it with me. And I thank you for writing something that I can imagine was almost too painful, too horrific to bear.

May it fuel the anti-death penalty movement, and make it more powerful than they are today!

Alla best,



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Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis

“Troy Davis’s struggle is also my struggle”

Many of you have been following the responses to I Am Troy Davis made by a group of prisoners serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole in Texas. They each wrote in response to several questions I had posed, including:

How was it for your emotionally to read I Am Troy Davis?

Are books like this useful for challenging and changing the system?

Here are their answers to my third and final question:

In what ways does I Am Troy Davis reflect your and your family’s experience? In what ways does it not?

The men’s answers, which I have consistently found thoughtful and illuminating, are below.

Mr. Charles McKinley:

To begin, the ONLY way this life story doesn’t reflect my own is the death row aspect. Every thing else is such a mirror of my own dilemma and the drive, love, and belief of those who help me to this day. I too am the victim of a broken, unjust, classist/racist court system. My attorney failed me unspeakably at a very crucial point in the legal process.

So there are many, many moments where I had to put the book down, take a deep breath, and just think and absorb it all. One of the most gratifying themes I took was that without the positive supporting network of family, the struggle is almost lost. For even though blood relations make a big difference, family doesn’t end there; each and every supporter is family too. I’ve seen so many people give up and give in because of the fact that they have no support outside themselves.

The fact that Troy was still ultimately killed is…a silent dread, I think most prisoners with inordinate amounts of time or death sentences share. There have been times that I’ve grappled with thoughts of possibly dying here in prison. It’s not a pleasant thought because a life term is its own slow death sentence. I’ve been fighting for 12 long and very frustrating years to be actually heard and listened to, and not just rubber-stamped denied. Troy Davis’s struggle is also my struggle.

I’ve seen the hurt in the eyes of loved ones, not hearing that I’ve finally prevailed. My mother’s soul has been severely blotched by my incarceration. My fear, too, is that heart break will be her demise. These are my silent and personal distresses dealing with a system that favors bottom lines over fundamental fairness. We, Troy Davis and I, share the painful experience of being poor, initially unversed in criminal law, naive to this ghastly beast of a system, being African American going through it all.


Kenneth Foster:

My plight and Troy’s plight was profoundly similar. While the circumstances of the crime we were accused of was different, the prejudice, corruption and family support was amazingly similar.

First and foremost, I come from a very faithful family like Troy’s. I was raised by my grandparents in a God-fearing home. Unfortunately, both of my parents were drug addicts and hustlers, thus while I had the best examples through my grandparents, I had the worst through my parents. Therefore, I became a by-product of both–a youth that graduated high school, started college, but also liked the wrong crowd. The wrong crowd put me at the wrong place at the wrong time.

My grandparents, like Virginia and Martina, stood by my side through thick and thin. That includes driving long hours for visits, staying on top of lawyers and gathering support.

As Troy watched his nephew and niece grow up, I, too, watched my infant daughter grow up behind the glass. Opposite of Troy, I didn’t touch my daughter for 12 years until I left death row. Like Troy, I had to build with my child in visiting rooms and letters.

And the same way Troy lost his mother while incarcerated, I lost my grandmother (who was truly my mother) while being incarcerated.

In Troy’s case he had an entire police department against him. I had an entire courthouse against me as the victim’s father was a prominent attorney in my city and it was common knowledge that revenge would be sought against the defendants. While the admitted shooter in this crime was executed, the victim’s family still cried for my execution even though it was established fact that I did not kill nor encouraged the killing of their son. I was sent to death row for being an alleged get-away driver. As Troy, I knew what it was like to have people screaming for your blood even when evidence was in their face that showed them I was not a guilty party.

Then, the sheer strength that Troy and I was invested with was perhaps the greatest trait, because we acted as the glue that kept our house together. If we had lost it, caved in, given up, how could our people have stood as strong and focused with us? Troy had tremendous faith. I gained a powerful faith and that faith allowed me to have vision and gain knowledge and understanding.

As highlighted in I Am Troy Davis, society rarely sees how the State turns a family in a victim as well, In truth, that is something that needs to be revealed more, because while people may not relate to a “criminal,” I do believe they can relate to caring for a family member. Not just “thugs” go to death row. Look at Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, Mumia Abu-Jamal, Randall Adams. As long as there is a box to put a check mark FOR the death penalty, there is no blue print for who goes to death row. While it may be disproportionate, it is not exclusive. It is inclusive.

This is why it must find its eradication so that the American mentality of “Kill” can be replaced with “Heal.”


David E. Davis

Like Troy, I was a young, black man living in a government-divested urban community in a conservative town in the South.  A community militarized, after years of white-flight had taken place, by the state law enforcement bureaucrats occupying the area. The streets in the community were infested with illegal substances, high powered weaponry, and liquor stores on every other corner. There existed a high unemployment and crime rate. And absolutely no resources. As I’m certain Troy was, I was overwhelmed by the setting…with all this transpiring, should it be surprising that the environment is overflowing with criminality?

I received double-life sentence, which means I could’ve ended up on death row, just like Troy, for defending my home, now ex-wife, and adult step daughter who was four at the time of the incident, so, like Troy, I’ve seen children grow into adults while here incarcerated.

I Am Troy Davis reflects my experience personally in that: he was tried in the news by the local media-bureaucrats during the investigative stage of his case before being indicted. There were blatant miscarriages of justice during the investigations by the bureaucrat investigators while handling witnesses and other evidence, the evidence was collected to support the media’s theory and relied upon to lead to the truth of the matter. I was not allowed to question investigators pertaining to the destroying of exculpatory evidence. Like Troy, I also lacked the funds to employ an effective defense.  Federal funding for the Innocence Project attempting to prove my “actual innocence” case after I was time-barred due to the anti-terrorism death penalty act, was halted  at a critical time during the procedure. There are many more likenesses, because this is a system and systems repeat themselves, while hoping we’re not educated towards how it operates.

In the end, ultimately, my case resembles Troy Davis’s in that all of the social illnesses prevalent in our communities have been scientifically proven to ‘effectively exterminate’ those living in the areas where they’re being intentionally implemented. Place an agitative military [police] embargo/blockade around any community in the world. Then fill it with: drugs, guns, alcohol, and take away its resources, divest in the community, and what you’ll get is criminality!

My an Troy’s experiences don’t just resemble, they’re one in the same. We are men-of-color in an imperialistic society, our standing within the system is the same. We have one alternative, assimilate to one stereotype within the system, or another. We’re being dis-allowed to be ourselves.

I Am Troy Davis.


Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis

Reviews from the Row #6: We were with the Davis family when they lost Troy

It continues to be overwhelming and inspiring to receive such thought-provoking responses to I Am Troy Davis from men and women on death row around the country. The response below is from Louis “Big Lou” Perez, on death row in Texas. He wrote it on September 9, which marks 16 years that he has been on death row. I was not sure until further correspondence if I had his permission to post his letter to me–thus the delay. Louis gave permission in his next letter, which is why I am posting it now.

If you would like to send the gift of I Am Troy Davis to a prisoner, you can do so here.

From “Big Lou”:

I’d like to share something with you…first thing, I just finished reading your book. It is Awesome!! Congratulations and I hope it becomes a World Wide Read.

Today…September 9…will make it 16 years that I’ve been on Death Row. The day I turned myself in (like Troy did) to clear my name. Reading the book reminds me of what I’m still going through and of how my family is still here for me. Like I said, Ms. Marlowe, I’m a very blessed man.

Reading about all the things Martina had gone through for her brother is such a carbon copy of what my sister Delia is doing for me. I am very honored that you allowed me to have this book, but you say here in your letter that you want me to share it (Plus…I already told every one around me that I have it and they ALL want to read it too) But I will get it back from them when they’re finished with it.

As for me, Ms. Marlowe, it was really easy for me to read because I’m still going through all the things Troy did. His struggle…his fight…all his let downs…EVERYTHING, I’m going through them right now. But, it was still a great read.

Troy was a blessed man too, but what REALLY caught my attention was that throughout his ordeal…he was still able to have contact visits with his family.  THAT made me both feel really good for him and jealous too. Here in Texas, Death Row doesn’t allow contact visits. After reading your book and then going back to look at all the photos….I won’t lie to you…I shed some tears because I didn’t get to hug my mother before she passed. My Grandparents, some cousins and friends either.

I sat there thinking about hugging my father and shed more tears.

I just visited with my sister Delia and told her about this…and she cried! But…they were good tears. I also got to see and thank Marlene Martin (from the Campaign to End the Death Penalty) for sending you my name.

Well Ma’am…I’m not sure how I can help you with this, but I will do what I can to do whatever you may need me to do. I’m somewhat of an elder here and I have a pretty good rapport with the men here. I’ll keep your address and will pass on this letter of yours to the men who do read the book. Maybe they will respond?

Again…thank you so much for allowing me to read your book. If there is anything else I can do to help, please…you only have to ask.

If you are ever again in touch with the Davis family…Please let them know that we were there with them when they lost Troy.  We were in awe of the injustice! And that my family and I send our deepest sympathies for their loss.

God bless you, Ms Marlowe.

Con Todo Mi Carino y Tambien Unos Fuerte Abrazos!

Louis C. Perez

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Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis

Reviews from the Row #5: The impact of a family’s love & support

(I received this review of I Am Troy Davis from a death row prisoner in Texas named Ker’Sean Ramey. Another prisoner had passed on the book to Ker’Sean, and had invited him to send me his review. If you are interested in reading reviews from other death row prisoners, you can do so here and here. And, here are responses from prisoners about why books like this matter, and what the experience was emotionally of reading I Am Troy Davis.)

From Ker’Sean Ramey:

I Am Troy Davis is very well articulated. It not only opens your eyes to the things that go on in the judicial system, but more importantly, it allows you to relive vicariously all the things the Davis family went through in their struggle to save a loved one and an innocent man. Through it all, they refused to let their personal issues or Troy’s situation tear their family apart. The sacrifice, strength and love the Davis family showed is a beautiful thing. I enjoyed this book to no end. I appreciate Sis. Martina Davis and Jen Marlowe for having both the courage to tell the story and the sense to know it’s one that really needs to be told. I recommend all family members and friends of those incarcerated read this book. It shows just how much of an impact their love and support has on us.

Stay focused, push, and believe!

Ker’Sean Ramey



Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis

A torch in the dark: prisoner responses to “I Am Troy Davis”

Dear friends,

As many of you know, dozens of prisoners have been sent copies of I Am Troy Davis (you can gift a book to a prisoner by clicking here) and were invited to participate in the I Am Troy Davis Community Book Club.

One of the suggested discussion questions I sent to the prison book groups was: “Are books like I Am Troy Davis useful for challenging/changing the system? Why or why not?” You can read responses to this question from three men incarcerated in Hughes Unit in Gatesville, TX here.

The same group of men also responded to the question:

How was it for you emotionally to read “I Am Troy Davis”?

Here are their answers below:

From David E. Davis:

From an emotional stand-point, reading I Am Troy Davis was polarizing. At times, I was spilling over with inexplicable joy due to the many triumphs of the two courageous main siblings involved in the story, then, at others, I was overwhelmed with extreme remorse, because of the multiple abuses rained down upon them through an apathetic system by an unempathic state bureaucracy designed to exterminate and discourage designated groups in its environment.

I found myself in retrospect longing to be a part of a family as committed to the best-interest of one another as the Davis’s, because once we’re divided, we’re easily conquered. What many families don’t seem to understand is that to someone being unjustly disposed of, what matters is that those who should stand at their side, stand and not fold over. It’s the fight that counts, not that they’ve won or lost or any level. But the manner in which they’re seemingly defeated! If the family doesn’t care, who should? The Davsis’s are winners, despite how things may seem to the lesser-minded individuals. They maintained their dignity!

A movie that moves me emotionally is Brave Heart, starring Mel Gibson. I’m inspired by the scene at its ending where while being eviscerated before being decapitated and with the state’s executioners urging him to renounce his belief in the struggle, he yells the word, “Freedom!” indicating his desire for the people to continue their struggle to be freed from an unjust ruling class. I was as touched by I Am Troy Davis as I was by this classic movie, because of the similarities: both were fighting against unjust government systems designed to oppress the groups they were a part of, both fought and were eventually executed by the state, and, most importantly, their stories lived on long after they were deceased, effecting change for the better.

Martina is the character in the story that I won’t ever forget. She knew the effects her and Troy’s story would have on its readers’ emotions. She has touched my heart deeply. Martina did not have to give into the innate feelings she carried inside her towards her brother and, thereby, stand at his side for all those years. I have a bio-sister who’s my only sibling and the exact opposite of Martina. The last thing she told me and the first was that she did not put me here! Is she totally blind/unaware that “I did not put me here?” Or that I wasn’t born a criminal?

I am a victim of social genocide, imperialism/capitalism. I Am Troy Davis…long live the Davis family and their unique commitment to struggle, and active love for one-another.

From Kenneth Foster Jr.

[Reading I Am Troy Davis] was dreadfully painful. As a prisoner who spent 10 years on death row and came within 6 hours of my execution (which I protested by refusing to walk to the death house) it was a brutal reminder of the grueling death penalty process.

Author Eduardo Galeano said, “Remembering and forgetting are both political acts.” For example, take the Jewish Holocaust. Many people try to propagate that it never happened. Others try to downplay the numbers. That is an attack. It’s suppression. However, the Jews said “NEVER FORGET!” That is a statement of self-determination and resistance. I take the approach the Jews did to anti-death-penalty activism– “NEVER FORGIVE. NEVER FORGET.”  This is not to trap myself into hate. I can, and will, forgive when the death penalty has been ended and programs are in place to instill justice and healing. I can’t forgive someone for something they continually seek to do.

Right now, my memory is my weapon. My memory will save what is worthwhile. My memory knows more about me than I do. It doesn’t lose what deserves to be saved. That’s why I Am Troy Davis  is so important to people like me and people who do this activism. It doesn’t allow us to forget what needs to be saved.

Emotionally, when I think about that memory, I think about something Albert Camus said:

“Capital punishment is the most premeditated of murders, to which no criminal’s deed, however calculated, can be compared. For there to be an equivalency, the death penalty would have to punsh a criminal who had warned his victim of the date at which he would inflict horrible death on him and who, from that moment onward, has confined him at his mercy for months. Such a monster is not encountered in private life.”

As one who survived death row, reading I Am Troy Davis makes me relive that. I know the author doesn’t seek to instill feelings of pain or depression in the reader, but when we face this reality (the capital punishment one), we face a cold reality of systemic social genocide that targets a certain segment of our society, and throws them into a system that is biased, and that doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand why we call it “a modern day legal lynching.”

Because I have been blessed with strength, vision, and passion, I use such books as guidance materials. It’s a torch in the dark. It reminds me when facing off against such a monster that might does not make right. When right is wrong, change is passed due!

From Mr. Charles McKinley

Reading I Am Troy Davis sent me on an emotional roller coaster. The tumultuous riot of anger, sadness, empathy, frustration, bewilderment, and inspiration had me constantly considering the nature of familial bonds, the court system, and human nature. I can’t begin to imagine how it is having a death warrant issued for your life. And at that, repeatedly!

I’m currently serving an aggravated life sentence for vehicular manslaughter. I was involved in an incidental wreck in which a young white woman passed. I empathize with Troy Davis and his situation in light of mine. Yet there are dynamics in his that are hard to grasp. It was enlightening and very inspirational to read of how positive and endearing Troy Davis remained in the face of such injustice and bigotry.

The so-called justice system failed Troy, his Mama, his sisters, his nephew and the myriad of supporters involved. The court system also miserably failed the MacPhail family. Instead of seeking TRUTH & JUSTICE for that family, the law enforcement officials involved provided no true closure. I am truly angered by this trend which has persisted for at least 2 centuries. Perhaps that’s why [Officer MacPhail’s mother] never truly attained the peace she sought.

Of course, I’m bewildered by how the courts could ignore and discard such critical evidence as the recantation affidavits and testimony that went alongside the flimsy crime scene “evidence.” It’s saddening, because it dims the light of hope for people like me. I could relate to so much of the book and the Davis’ struggle. I was constantly teary-eyed. Reading about his death row experience helped build my understanding and expanded my perspective on guys I’m doing time with. I know guys that have fought their way off the row and are now tacking capital life terms or terms of life without parole.


Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis

Why books like these matter

Dear friends,

Dozens of prisoners have been sent copies of I Am Troy Davis (you can gift a book to a prisoner by clicking here) and were invited to participate in the I Am Troy Davis Community Book Club. The response I have received has been overwhelming, with prison discussion groups of the book happening all over the country, including on death row in Texas, Alabama, and California.

One of the suggested discussion questions I sent to the prison book groups was:

“Are books like I Am Troy Davis useful for challenging/changing the system? Why or why not?”

Here are the responses to that question that I received from a group of readers incarcerated in Hughes unit, in Gatesville, TX:


From Mr. Charles McKinley 

It’s my firm opinion that YES books like this are PARAMOUNT to changing and challenging the system! The reasons being

1) it brings to the forefront facts, feelings and instances that normally may not get a full audience

2) it empowers those most able to effect change through educated challenging which is facilitated by the PEOPLE!

3) it gives you both sides of the coin and tells the full story without injustice to any party.

So many subtle things were explained clearly, concisely, and most importantly, in an easy-to-grasp fashion. I Am Troy Davis got to the meat and potatoes, minus a lot of technical jargon or unnecessarily complex terminology. The reader is found riveted in the most visceral fashion to the text and is not lost for a moment having to google a term or ponder contextual implications. Absolutely wonderful. That’s how you get attention.

To truly ignite the spark of CHANGE you must be able to identify, explain and assess the target; you must be able to formulate a plan of attack and method of execution of such plan; and there must be benchmarks to know if and when progress has been made toward the overarching goal. This book did so beautifully in eloquent and gripping simplicity. Thank you to Mr. Troy Davis and his family of warriors, as well as the authors. I stand at the ready to continue fighting. Saulte and Power to the People!


From David E. Davis

I believe that a by-product of being correctly educated is change; therefore books such as I Am Troy Davis, which highlight the innate injustices within the system being acted out towards certain designated groups in the society where it’s placed into operation, are extremely useful towards challenging/changing the system and its status-quo.

Before receiving the biography I Am Troy Davis I had an un-thorough outline of the actual struggle; although after I was done reading, I felt as if I now have an in-depth detailed description, which I can relate to, of not only what today’s struggles should be about, but also how to wage combat against the system, and how to conduct myself along the way. My consciousness has been totally elevated in many areas of the struggle.

The I Am Troy Davis story gives reference points to all those involved or contemplating involvement with the struggle. This book tempts anyone who’s a decent human being in possession of a conscience to enter the struggle on behalf of their fellow human beings. If we don’t stand for others, there’ll be no one left to stand for us, on the day injustice knocks on our door.

There are a select number of individuals who come to the point where they totally understand the struggle, the system we’re up against, and are able to correctly articulate both. Empowering books such as this bring these individuals out of the closet through allowing them to know there’s a place for them amongst those in opposition to the destructive system in operation throughout the world.

Books such as I Am Troy Davis with intertwining biographies such as Martina’s, written by Jen Marlowe, confirm that the abuses we’ve experienced at the hands of the state bureaucracy designed to preserve the system were not illusions nor us just crying wolf. The pictures painted by these books are mental reinforcement.

I conclude that: YES! Books like the one written by Ms. Marlowe, Martina and Troy Davis are extremely useful towards the dismantling and reformation of the destructive system in operation, to where it meets the needs of the environment and those who live within it.


From Kenneth Foster Jr:

It’s ABSOLUTELY useful due to what Howard Zinn said-

“History can help our struggles, if not conclusively, then at least suggestively.”

We always hear that the victors of war write the history. This is why we must continuously tell OUR OWN story so that what we have gone through is not erased in the sands of time.

Zinn also said that “Rebellion often starts as something cultural.” Rebellion being not just physically, but literary as well, because both are actions  that stand up to an injustice. One may say, “something cultural?” Yes, continuing–

“The death penalty itself is only one manifestation of the violence directed by the state against those whom it considers dispensable, either because they are poor, non-white, or part of a movement that threatens the existing structure of wealth and power.”

The underlined is a “culture” because culture is a collective of values, struggles, sense of survival, wisdom, beliefs, wants, needs, desires, good times and bad, all rolled up into one vehicle called culture.

Part of our culture is writers that stand out and stand up to injustice even when it’s not popular or safe. I’m sure Ms. Jen Marlowe could have made more fame and money writing a suspense-novel. But, she chose to be a part of history by telling a story that is detrimental to all of our lives, because if no person objected to wrongs, then they would last forever. Justice is not only violated by falsehood; it may be equally outraged by silence.

Books like this remind us to what is REALLY going on, what we are blind to and what organized activity can do. For as Zinn said-

“A poem can inspire a movement. A pamphlet can spark a revolution. Civil disobedience can arouse people and provoke us to think. When we organize with one another, when we get involved, when we stand up and speak out together, we can create a power no government can suppress.”

With us is where it begins, and with us (ie–people like Jen Marlowe, Troy Davis, Martina Davis-Correia, Lawrence Foster Sr, Campaign to End the Death Penalty) is where it (capital punishment) will end!






Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis

Reviews from the Row (#4)

(Of all the amazing feedback and responses I’ve received about I Am Troy Davis, I have been consistently moved–blown away, even–by the responses I’ve received by men and women in prison, many of whom are on death row. This response to the book was sent to me from Illinois by a man named Adolfo Davis, who was sentenced at 14 years of age to life in prison without the possibility of parole.)

Thank you for writing me and sending me the most powerful book that I have ever read, and at the same time, the most heart-breaking. I read about Troy Davis in the Campaign to End the Death Penalty Newsletter, but the book allowed me to walk in his shoes.

Reading Troy’s journey made me sad, sick, and angry, because it shows the reality of Black Men here in America. Each day the prisons are being filled up with Black Men and the courts are giving them numbers that they can’t do so the reality is they will die in prison. And if they don’t have a case that deals with DNA, you don’t have a chance at regaining your freedom. because the courts don’t care if the witnesses recanted and now telling the truth. The courts only believe them when it help them get a conviction. So the fight to prove your innocence became moot for some. Because they don’t have a DNA case and they don’t have that family support like Troy did.

In black families, when someone get in trouble, in their eyes you are guilty even if you tell them you are innocent, and if it’s a serious case like murder, rape, or robbery, they will turn their back on you because they don’t want to look like they supporting what you are charged with. And on top of that, they are uneducated, so they can’t help if they wanted to. So that makes the fight harder and moot for some. That all plays a role in why so many people sign their lives away and take deals. But reading Troy’s journey shows us that even with the support of the world and the evidence it’s still not enough for a black man in America.

Jen, the sad thing about all this is there are other Troy Davis’s strapped in these concrete necropolis around the world and those who are free who are about to end up here in prison on death row or with life. That cycle will not stop, that’s the reality of this.

Jen, the reality is that Troy touched the world and true love was witness, but at the same time, he died an innocent man. People say in his death something good came out of it, but that’s some bullshit. Please forgive my language, but nothing good can come out of an innocent man being killed and it continues across America. What really changed? He is gone and his family died fighting with him. Life shouldn’t be like this. Where is the true justice, if it really exists?

I Am Troy Davis, born into a world where justice is my enemy and freedom is not guaranteed. With that said, I will close this.

Take care,



Filed under Death Penalty, Troy Davis