Category Archives: Death Penalty

The conversations that matter

Dear friends,

When I first put out the call asking for people nation-wide to join me in the I Am Troy Davis Community Book Club, I could not have anticipated the results. I never imagined that 20 inspiring organizations would sign on to partner with the Davis family and me, helping to organize 45 book discussions throughout 20 states.  (See responses to the Community Book Club here!)

But what really blew me away was the enthusiastic participation from the most invisible, marginalized members of our society: those behind bars.  donkeysaddle projectsHaymarket Books and the Campaign to End the Death Penalty partnered to send 50 copies of I Am Troy Davis to prisoners–many on death row, others serving life sentences without the possibility of parole, and responses to the book and to the invitation to participate in the Community Book Club came flooding in.

As Kenneth Foster Jr (formerly on TX death row, now serving a life sentence without parole) wrote, “The dream for every prisoner is to be a part of the conversations that matter.”

And as Emilia Carr, on death row in Florida, added: “Thank you for inviting me…to be able to be a part of things such as this…reminds you that people care that you are a human with a voice.”

In light of the lack of an indictment in the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, these correspondences have taken on a new level of meaning. The “Black Lives Matter” signs that I’ve seen at protests resonate powerfully with the letters I have been receiving from the mostly young, black men whom society and the state has rejected and warehoused.

I hope you will take time to read and reflect on these prisoners’ writings, including a radio spot by Mumia Abu-Jamal.

You can help the conversation continue!
 I Am Troy Davis as a gift to a prisoner this holiday season!

Haymarket Books has set up a special webpage for the purpose of gifting I Am Troy Davis to a prisoner. All you have to do is fill out the billing information, and Haymarket Books will send the book to a prisoner who is waiting to receive one–along with a note, letting him/her know that the book is a holiday gift from an anonymous donor. (Haymarket Books is offering a 40% discount! Just enter the coupon code Holiday40 at checkout!)

(If you would like to gift The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian’s Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker to a prisoner, let me know! I’m planning to get that book inside many prisons as well!)

You will be hearing more from me in the weeks to come about what donkeysaddle projects accomplished this year and what lies ahead. Please know that none of our work can  happen without your support.  I hope you will consider making a monthly contribution to donkeysaddle projects, or, a one-time donation!

I look forward to being in touch as 2014 draws to a close, and, together, to continuing to foster the conversations that matter most.

In solidarity and in struggle,

Jen Marlowe
donkeysaddle projects
Twitter: @donkeysaddleorg
Blog: View from the donkey’s saddle

Senior seminar on the death penalty at UNC-Wilmington read and discuss “I Am Troy Davis” as part of the Community Book Club.


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Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis



(From Rob Will, on death row in TX, in response to I Am Troy Davis)

“The world is but a canvas to the imagination.” Henry David Thoreau

This book is haunting, beautiful but haunting… It is just past 2am and I am up listening to some nice jazz. “Lighthouse Blues” by the Jazz Crusaders is on and the sax is lovely and the vibraphone is quite nice. Good meditation music. Earlier I had to put down, “I Am Troy Davis” by Jen Marlowe, breathe deeply and just meditate, simply because this book has been evoking deep emotion from within me. This is the second time I have had to do this.

The first was yesterday when listening to Maurice Ravel’s orchestration of Modest Mussorgsky’s “Pictures At An Art Exhibition”. Mussorgsky wrote this piece of music in honor of his friend, the artist Victor Hartmann, who died too young. This piece is alright. I particularly like the triumphant ending but what really got to me was the reason Mussorgsky wrote the music. Like Troy Davis, Victor Hartmann died an untimely death… Mussorgsky honored his friend through the Art of creating music and Jen Marlowe has honored the life of Troy Davis, his family, his friends and their struggle through the Art of her writing. One of the most powerful aspects of this book is how Jen humanizes everyone involved and links individual lives and experiences with larger psychosociopolitical issues.

Thinking of these things and vibing with the music led my Mind into the realm of Artistic creation… I picked up my pencil, pen, paints, an illustration board and books and began creating… The idea of unity kept dancing through my mind and while going back and forth from jazz to classical music I, in turn, let my paint brush dance across the canvas. I glanced over at the book and quickly read the quotes on the cover and first few pages from well-known people in the social justice struggle… Sister Helen Prejean, Maya Angelou, Cornel West, Amy Goodman, Susan Sarandon, Eve Ensler, Gloria Steinem…Unity, unity, unity…

I let the motion of the color field background rock with the rhythm of the music and the Energy of the Color Theory I was utilizing. Once the background was done I put the piece to the side so it could dry overnight and be ready for the geometrical forms symbolizing Unity that I had envisioned… Some Fela Kuti – who is one of my favorite musicians – just came on and this sounds like an excellent signal to finish the painting. Fela was definitely about struggle, the vibrancy if community involvement and international solidarity. At the core of all this is Unity and all of those ideas are illustrated well in “I Am Troy Davis”, which I will continue reading once I am finished with this painting.

(please consider making a holiday gift of I Am Troy Davis to a prisoner! 40% discount just by entering coupon code Holiday40! Your gift will be sent to a prisoner along with a note explaining that the book is an anonymous holiday gift.)

Back of painting entitled "Unity" by Rob Will

Back of painting entitled “Unity” by Rob Will

Front of painting entitled "Unity" by Rob Will

Front of painting entitled “Unity” by Rob Will

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Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis

If society would only see how foul the judicial system is…

Ray_Domineque_ALDomineque Hakim Marcelle Ray had not originally been on the list of prisoners to whom we sent a copy of I Am Troy Davis. However, another prisoner with him on Alabama’s death row had been sent the book, and spoke to Domineque about the Community Book Club, passing the book onto him so he could participate.

Here is what Domineque wrote about I Am Troy Davis:

The book titled I Am Troy Davis was very good reading. It relates to the article “Prison is the New Slave Ship.” His sister Martina was a real ride or die activist. Also a woman of true family value.

Death penalty cases like Troy’s are so many throughout this nation. But it always is disregarded and it prevents the accused for a fair trial.

Publications are very good reading but documentaries show more attention-wise. If society would only see how foul the judicial system is concerning the death penalty cases, then perhaps the fight to end it would prevail.

Like Troy, I’m also innocent. The trial attorneys sold me out and even stayed on my appeal process until I wrote a letter to several different law firms requesting representation. Some of the Black Civil Rights Activists in Selma had helped put me in here. The false imprisonment was pure politics. So I can see just how Troy felt.

I’d like for my story to reach the outside. You don’t hear too many like it from Alabama, especially someone with my background.

Once again, you ha a world of supporters to help put the word out and I appreciate that. But don’t stop.


Well, until then, knowledge and God

Love your love,

Domineque Hakim Marcelle Ray

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Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis

“I had never read a book in my life until I came to prison”

Chucky MamouThe correspondence I have been having with prisoners to whom we have sent copies of I Am Troy Davis continues to astound and amaze me. Below, are excerpts from two letters that I received from Chucky Mamou, on death row in Texas, posted here with his permission. His comments about the book and about his own writing moved me more than any response or review I have ever received…

Letter #1, September 11, 2014

Let me begin by ‘apologizing.’ Here’s why: My neighbor passed me a copy of your book, I Am Troy Davis. My intention was not to read it at all. See, Troy and I shared a pen-pal, of sorts. I knew about his case, and I received a message from him. In the Washington DC rally at the USSC in 2011 of Jan, my flyers was next to all his buttons and etc…We all know the death penalty is barbaric in nature, archaic in practice, and Americanly inhumane; such truths has been known, said and fought against since 1770’s. And still NOTHING has changed. Feel me?

For me, it’s not what’s right or wrong, or  just or injust. It’s about the entire social conscious of this country. The whole fatuitious hypocrisy that Americans ‘buy’ on a daily basis!…

Michael Brown was unarmed with his HANDS up in the air, and that cop shot that child in his eye, face, chest, and arm–a total of 6 shots. But the cop has raised a million in cash for his use to defend himself in court, ‘if’ it goes to court. Political and professional folks say, “Well we don’t have all the facts.” But you let me or you shoot anyone 6 times, and they gonna send us straight to DEATH ROW, without any damn facts!

So, I wasn’t inclined on reading ‘any’ book about something I am so passionate about myself. I see this nation the way its suppose to be seen. I make no excuses for this nation and the atrocities it manifest.  What happened to Gary Graham, Todd Willingham, Troy Davis and countless others don’t make it right. Don’t comfort others in the same situation. At least, I speak for myself.

Let me tell you something. At this very moment of me typing this out to you, the state of Texas is about to murder (they call it execute) Willie Trottie, and you know what? He ain’t innocent, but if there was anybody I would fight for to have another chance at freedom, IT WOULD HAVE BEEN  HIM! He made a mistake…don’t we all?

As far as your book, the reason why I did ‘read’ it and was glad that I did: I have always been a fan of Martina Davis and the unyielding fight she devoted towards helping her brother. We all would be so lucky to have a family member such as her. And it’s not that our family love us any less, rather they just lack the courage and devotion that she displayed. She is (not was) a rarity.

Plus my neighbor told me that Troy had several photos inside the book where he shared with his family members, and I wanted to experience that defacto joy that he experienced. Sure I can never capture the moment, and any feelings that I felt were faux in nature; but I am American, and like the majority, I like my Reality TV (even though it’s not real ) too.

Now I must commend the author, cause the book was well written. Sista-gurl, you got some skillz. (smile.) I write books too, and I do appreciate a good read. The photos are a delight, and I would be willing to give up my soul, if I had a chance to hold any of my children the way Troy held his niece and nephew. I would give anything if I could be close enough to my mother (or any damn body) where I could smell them, hear them laugh in my ear, or just touch them. I haven’t touched another human being since 1999, and I’ll be the first to admit that the idea of touching another human being now seem shameful for me. It would be awkward…

I have never once lied about my innocence nor the unbelievable chain of events in my case, not once. I feel like Dorothy in the land of Oz, but there is no wizard that can help me, there is no friends that I can walk the golden brick road with, hell, there isn’t even any flying monkeys in this real struggle I find myself in.

Good day to you and God bless you.


Letter #2, November 13, 2014

(in response to my asking him about the books he writes)

I write ‘fiction.’ What one may call urban novels. Be it romance novels, or thuggery in nature, all of my books have a ‘moral message’ that I try to translate. I do not glorify nothing that would cause harm in any way. I simply try to explain how things can actually get so fucked up...I am working on my own autobiography…I don’t write for money. I write for the appreciation of the art. With each book I write I make sure that my level of creation and creativity is raised. i want to show the progression of my writings, if you will. I had never read a book in my life until I came to prison. So in a lot of ways I am raw. Still learning on the fly. Still eager.

(in response to I Am Troy Davis)

I feel that if Catholics are allowed to Saintanize the members of their flock that they deem ‘activist’ then surely we should be able to place the same Saintship on those that are within the struggle with every purpose of ‘fixing’ the injust within this country’s justice system and social ornery circles too which we all live and are divided within. Martina is worthy of such a title. And I think her son will continue what she started. In fact, I would be ‘shocked’ if 20 years from now he isn’t a major activist in a field of justice in America.

But you know what? The story you told is sooo common within the minority of the 99%. The struggle is real, so is racism, classism, elitism, and prejudice. It’s all of these traits that we all judge one another, and seem to relate to the other. Don’t make it right, it just clarify who we are as a nation of people within America.


I Am Troy Davis was made beautiful–so by your writing skills. Never lose sight of the work that you did. When Mrs. Virginia sat in her chair and died peacefully, it was the way you described the event. The climax that lead to it, that tugs at a reader’s heart…but ‘you’ and only you gave Troy’s story and his family a feel of sincere humanity that wasn’t pretentious. And I have no doubt that it was hard for you to relive a story that you found yourself a part of. Pictures of you inside of Mrs. Virginia’s house, hugged up to Saint Martina–tells me that they trusted your person. And there’s no telling the stories you could have told that was personal too, which they shared with you. Your writing made it beautiful. Real talk.

(In response to my asking how he was holding up.)

Thank you for asking me about my well-being, However, nothing has changed with my mental-state, emotionally…not everyone in prison is innocent or unjustly convicted. But for those who are truly innocent (like me) how can I ever wear a daily smile on my face? How can I ever do away with despair, depression and ill feelings? Because faith alone has never been an antidote nor cure to severe brokenheartedness. The favored Mother Teresa wrote in her book, “There was a time when I saw all the rape and murder of babies, and defenseless women that I questioned the existence of a God who would stand by and allow these atrocities to go on against the weak and innocent.”

What gets lost is that this was not just a thought that crossed her mind the way wind blew across her face. She was depressed, and her depression didn’t stop until she was removed from that crazy war zone. Same with me. I can never fully begin to comprehend what a recovery really is, until I am given my freedom again.

Chucky wrote a lot more…about the poverty in which he grew up, how he was one of four children sharing a bed, tussling at night over an extra share of blanket, about sexual abuse he experienced at the home of a neighbor, about having been in shootouts, being kidnapped, left for dead with his head split wide open. He wrote, “I’ve been that kid stealing from grocery stores just so that I can experience what a cake taste like.”

And he wrote:

Through all my ‘struggles,’ from the depths of the low of the lows, is why I am able to sit in this moldy, germ-infested cell; and still cling onto my sanity after 16 years of all this bullshit. I’m always mindful just how vulnerable I am emotionally, so I do not tease or test the boundaries of my sanity’s limitations. I do not pretend to be better than I really am. I do not play chess with my honesty.

To purchase a copy of I Am Troy Davis as a gift to a prisoner:

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Mumia Abu Jamal responds to I AM TROY DAVIS: “May it fuel the anti-death penalty movement”

Mumia Abu JamaI knew that my publisher (the amazing Haymarket Books) had sent a copy of I Am Troy Davis to Mumia Abu Jamal.  So when I saw his name and return address on the envelope, I should not have been surprised–yet I was. Surprised, and a little star struck. I had been following Mumia’s case–and his writing–for years now. It took me a few minutes to really process that he was writing to me, and that he was writing in response to the book I had written with Troy Davis and his family.

The next day, I got another letter from Mumia. This one was the text of what I later found out was a radio spot he had done about the book for the Prison Radio, an independent multi-media production studio dedicated to challenging unjust police and prosecutorial misconduct that results in mass incarceration, racism, and gender discrimination.

You can listen to Mumia’s three-minute radio spot about I Am Troy Davis here.

And, below, is the letter he wrote me, which I received his permission to post.

And–you can buy a copy of I Am Troy Davis to be sent as a gift to a prisoner here.

Dear Jen,

As you may know, I’m in the midst of working on a book, so it took me awhile to get to Troy’s. But, of course, I did.

It is, as I’m sure you know, a powerful, damning story of a human tragedy.

It is, moreover, a real condemnation of the U.S. Way of Death.

When reading it, I couldn’t help but think of how politics has completely dominated the judiciary–and, without question, the pardon/parole machinery.

His family (esp. Mom & Sister) fought–quite literally–to their last breath, never doubting that in an injustice so strong, surely they could finish their days in the company of their son/brother.

I think, in many ways, the family and the activists underestimated the level of rot in the system, never really believing that they would betray their oaths–and visit on Troy the foul fullness of state murder.

I remember being buoyed when the U.S. Supremes actually sent it back for an evidentiary hearing.

Once again, they raised hope, only to spit disappointment on the friends and family of Troy.

I will surely distribute it, and, perhaps, donate it to the library, so that many, many guys can read it.

I thank you for sharing it with me. And I thank you for writing something that I can imagine was almost too painful, too horrific to bear.

May it fuel the anti-death penalty movement, and make it more powerful than they are today!

Alla best,


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“Troy Davis’s struggle is also my struggle”

Many of you have been following the responses to I Am Troy Davis made by a group of prisoners serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole in Texas. They each wrote in response to several questions I had posed, including:

How was it for your emotionally to read I Am Troy Davis?

Are books like this useful for challenging and changing the system?

Here are their answers to my third and final question:

In what ways does I Am Troy Davis reflect your and your family’s experience? In what ways does it not?

The men’s answers, which I have consistently found thoughtful and illuminating, are below.

Mr. Charles McKinley:

To begin, the ONLY way this life story doesn’t reflect my own is the death row aspect. Every thing else is such a mirror of my own dilemma and the drive, love, and belief of those who help me to this day. I too am the victim of a broken, unjust, classist/racist court system. My attorney failed me unspeakably at a very crucial point in the legal process.

So there are many, many moments where I had to put the book down, take a deep breath, and just think and absorb it all. One of the most gratifying themes I took was that without the positive supporting network of family, the struggle is almost lost. For even though blood relations make a big difference, family doesn’t end there; each and every supporter is family too. I’ve seen so many people give up and give in because of the fact that they have no support outside themselves.

The fact that Troy was still ultimately killed is…a silent dread, I think most prisoners with inordinate amounts of time or death sentences share. There have been times that I’ve grappled with thoughts of possibly dying here in prison. It’s not a pleasant thought because a life term is its own slow death sentence. I’ve been fighting for 12 long and very frustrating years to be actually heard and listened to, and not just rubber-stamped denied. Troy Davis’s struggle is also my struggle.

I’ve seen the hurt in the eyes of loved ones, not hearing that I’ve finally prevailed. My mother’s soul has been severely blotched by my incarceration. My fear, too, is that heart break will be her demise. These are my silent and personal distresses dealing with a system that favors bottom lines over fundamental fairness. We, Troy Davis and I, share the painful experience of being poor, initially unversed in criminal law, naive to this ghastly beast of a system, being African American going through it all.


Kenneth Foster:

My plight and Troy’s plight was profoundly similar. While the circumstances of the crime we were accused of was different, the prejudice, corruption and family support was amazingly similar.

First and foremost, I come from a very faithful family like Troy’s. I was raised by my grandparents in a God-fearing home. Unfortunately, both of my parents were drug addicts and hustlers, thus while I had the best examples through my grandparents, I had the worst through my parents. Therefore, I became a by-product of both–a youth that graduated high school, started college, but also liked the wrong crowd. The wrong crowd put me at the wrong place at the wrong time.

My grandparents, like Virginia and Martina, stood by my side through thick and thin. That includes driving long hours for visits, staying on top of lawyers and gathering support.

As Troy watched his nephew and niece grow up, I, too, watched my infant daughter grow up behind the glass. Opposite of Troy, I didn’t touch my daughter for 12 years until I left death row. Like Troy, I had to build with my child in visiting rooms and letters.

And the same way Troy lost his mother while incarcerated, I lost my grandmother (who was truly my mother) while being incarcerated.

In Troy’s case he had an entire police department against him. I had an entire courthouse against me as the victim’s father was a prominent attorney in my city and it was common knowledge that revenge would be sought against the defendants. While the admitted shooter in this crime was executed, the victim’s family still cried for my execution even though it was established fact that I did not kill nor encouraged the killing of their son. I was sent to death row for being an alleged get-away driver. As Troy, I knew what it was like to have people screaming for your blood even when evidence was in their face that showed them I was not a guilty party.

Then, the sheer strength that Troy and I was invested with was perhaps the greatest trait, because we acted as the glue that kept our house together. If we had lost it, caved in, given up, how could our people have stood as strong and focused with us? Troy had tremendous faith. I gained a powerful faith and that faith allowed me to have vision and gain knowledge and understanding.

As highlighted in I Am Troy Davis, society rarely sees how the State turns a family in a victim as well, In truth, that is something that needs to be revealed more, because while people may not relate to a “criminal,” I do believe they can relate to caring for a family member. Not just “thugs” go to death row. Look at Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, Mumia Abu-Jamal, Randall Adams. As long as there is a box to put a check mark FOR the death penalty, there is no blue print for who goes to death row. While it may be disproportionate, it is not exclusive. It is inclusive.

This is why it must find its eradication so that the American mentality of “Kill” can be replaced with “Heal.”


David E. Davis

Like Troy, I was a young, black man living in a government-divested urban community in a conservative town in the South.  A community militarized, after years of white-flight had taken place, by the state law enforcement bureaucrats occupying the area. The streets in the community were infested with illegal substances, high powered weaponry, and liquor stores on every other corner. There existed a high unemployment and crime rate. And absolutely no resources. As I’m certain Troy was, I was overwhelmed by the setting…with all this transpiring, should it be surprising that the environment is overflowing with criminality?

I received double-life sentence, which means I could’ve ended up on death row, just like Troy, for defending my home, now ex-wife, and adult step daughter who was four at the time of the incident, so, like Troy, I’ve seen children grow into adults while here incarcerated.

I Am Troy Davis reflects my experience personally in that: he was tried in the news by the local media-bureaucrats during the investigative stage of his case before being indicted. There were blatant miscarriages of justice during the investigations by the bureaucrat investigators while handling witnesses and other evidence, the evidence was collected to support the media’s theory and relied upon to lead to the truth of the matter. I was not allowed to question investigators pertaining to the destroying of exculpatory evidence. Like Troy, I also lacked the funds to employ an effective defense.  Federal funding for the Innocence Project attempting to prove my “actual innocence” case after I was time-barred due to the anti-terrorism death penalty act, was halted  at a critical time during the procedure. There are many more likenesses, because this is a system and systems repeat themselves, while hoping we’re not educated towards how it operates.

In the end, ultimately, my case resembles Troy Davis’s in that all of the social illnesses prevalent in our communities have been scientifically proven to ‘effectively exterminate’ those living in the areas where they’re being intentionally implemented. Place an agitative military [police] embargo/blockade around any community in the world. Then fill it with: drugs, guns, alcohol, and take away its resources, divest in the community, and what you’ll get is criminality!

My an Troy’s experiences don’t just resemble, they’re one in the same. We are men-of-color in an imperialistic society, our standing within the system is the same. We have one alternative, assimilate to one stereotype within the system, or another. We’re being dis-allowed to be ourselves.

I Am Troy Davis.


Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis

Reviews from the Row #6: We were with the Davis family when they lost Troy

It continues to be overwhelming and inspiring to receive such thought-provoking responses to I Am Troy Davis from men and women on death row around the country. The response below is from Louis “Big Lou” Perez, on death row in Texas. He wrote it on September 9, which marks 16 years that he has been on death row. I was not sure until further correspondence if I had his permission to post his letter to me–thus the delay. Louis gave permission in his next letter, which is why I am posting it now.

If you would like to send the gift of I Am Troy Davis to a prisoner, you can do so here.

From “Big Lou”:

I’d like to share something with you…first thing, I just finished reading your book. It is Awesome!! Congratulations and I hope it becomes a World Wide Read.

Today…September 9…will make it 16 years that I’ve been on Death Row. The day I turned myself in (like Troy did) to clear my name. Reading the book reminds me of what I’m still going through and of how my family is still here for me. Like I said, Ms. Marlowe, I’m a very blessed man.

Reading about all the things Martina had gone through for her brother is such a carbon copy of what my sister Delia is doing for me. I am very honored that you allowed me to have this book, but you say here in your letter that you want me to share it (Plus…I already told every one around me that I have it and they ALL want to read it too) But I will get it back from them when they’re finished with it.

As for me, Ms. Marlowe, it was really easy for me to read because I’m still going through all the things Troy did. His struggle…his fight…all his let downs…EVERYTHING, I’m going through them right now. But, it was still a great read.

Troy was a blessed man too, but what REALLY caught my attention was that throughout his ordeal…he was still able to have contact visits with his family.  THAT made me both feel really good for him and jealous too. Here in Texas, Death Row doesn’t allow contact visits. After reading your book and then going back to look at all the photos….I won’t lie to you…I shed some tears because I didn’t get to hug my mother before she passed. My Grandparents, some cousins and friends either.

I sat there thinking about hugging my father and shed more tears.

I just visited with my sister Delia and told her about this…and she cried! But…they were good tears. I also got to see and thank Marlene Martin (from the Campaign to End the Death Penalty) for sending you my name.

Well Ma’am…I’m not sure how I can help you with this, but I will do what I can to do whatever you may need me to do. I’m somewhat of an elder here and I have a pretty good rapport with the men here. I’ll keep your address and will pass on this letter of yours to the men who do read the book. Maybe they will respond?

Again…thank you so much for allowing me to read your book. If there is anything else I can do to help, please…you only have to ask.

If you are ever again in touch with the Davis family…Please let them know that we were there with them when they lost Troy.  We were in awe of the injustice! And that my family and I send our deepest sympathies for their loss.

God bless you, Ms Marlowe.

Con Todo Mi Carino y Tambien Unos Fuerte Abrazos!

Louis C. Perez

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Filed under Criminal Justice, Death Penalty, Troy Davis